Riding the Beartooth Mountains

24 August, 2010


The third weekend in August we went up to our favorite spot in the Beartooth Mountains with friends. We camp near the old sheep pens across from Little Bear Lake overlooking Chain Lakes. We are at about 9400 feet elevation.

The first day we took a short ride over to Rainbow Lake, crossing a couple creeks. The second day we rode to Top and Dollar Lakes and up the Stockade drainage to Stockade Lake where we had lunch by the lake.

We tightened cinches, mounted up and rode along the creek to Losekamp Lake at the base of Tibbs Butte.

From there we started climbing out of that drainage up to Hauser Lake. From Hauser we went to Rainbow Lake, crossed the Morrison Jeep Trail and back over to camp across from Little Bear Lake. It was about a 6 hour ride of sheer beauty.

On the third day, we rode over to Rainbow Lake and explored a new trail that took us to Top Lake through the woods.From Top Lake, we rode down into Little Sawtooth Lake at the base of Sawtooth Mountain where we had lunch.Then we rode back to camp along the Morrison Jeep Trail and the old sheep trail. To me there is no place closer to heaven than the top of the mountains. Happy Trails!


Cody Wyoming Rendezvous Royale

01 October, 2010

As part of the Rendezvous Royale week in Cody, Wyoming, there are many happenings around town during the fourth week of September each year. The Buffalo Bill Historical Center hosts the Cody High Style Fashion Show, the Quick Draw, a nationally recognized art show and sale, an exhibit of the best western artisans and craftsman and the Patrons Ball as the grand finale. There are also many happenings around town. The Irma Hotel hosts a Art Show and Sale upstairs in their historic hotel rooms. At the Cody Auditorium, there is show and sale featuring western craftsman and artists. On Thursday, Sheridan Avenue is closed for three blocks for the Boot, Scoot and Boogie. Merchants serve refreshments and there are many exhibits on display ending with a fashion show. It is a fun and exciting time!


Elk Meadow Ranch - Sold

10 November, 2010

Canyon Real Estate represented the buyer, New Mount Carmel Foundation and the Carmelite Monks of Wyoming in the purchase of this ranch. The ranch consists of 2500 acres next to National Forest at the base of Carter Mountain with Meeteetse Creek flowing through the ranch. State, BLM and Forest grazing leases are being transferred to the new buyer.

This ranch was found after researching and viewing many ranches throughout northern Wyoming. Canyon Real Estate can assist you in finding Wyoming ranches for sale that will meet your criteria. Located in historic downtown Cody, Wyoming we will help you re-capture the last of the old west here in northwest Wyoming. Call 307-527-7092 for more information on ranches for sale in Wyoming.undefined

Wintertime in Wyoming

13 December, 2010

This weekend, my husband and I made our annual trip to the Line Creek Canyon in Clark, Wyoming at the base of the Beartooth Mountains to cut down our Christmas tree. This year we have had more snow that normal, so on our first attempt a week ago, we did not make it very far. The chinook winds had brought in warmer air, so some of the snow had melted. Normally, we criss cross back and forth across the creek, but with more snow this year we only made one crossing.I had another mission this year. I was to bring home the largest tree that I could get onto the 6 wheeler for the Carmelite Monastery. First, we cut our tree down and loaded it on top. Then I spotted the approximately 15 foot tree with pine cones and proceeded to climb up to it. We loaded it onto the 6 wheeler and started down the mountain.


It was another wonderful day in Wyoming!

Big Horn Sheep

27 December, 2010

On the last weekend of December 2010, we took a drive up the Northfork Highway, west of Cody, Wyoming, to the east gate of Yellowstone National Park. Teddy Roosevelt called it the most scenic 50 miles in the country. Inside the Shoshone National Forest, we started looking for wildlife. A buffalo was grazing peacefully in an open meadow. Then I spotted two beautiful rams. After a few minutes, they were joined by two more rams. Watching their actions was very intriguing. Two of them decided to cross the road right in front of our vehicle.

At that point, heads starting butting. Unfortunately, they were behind the guard rail. We decided to drive on toward Pahaska marveling in the the winter wonderland. On our return trip, the two rams had moved back across the road and were continuing the show. These are such majestic animals and it is always an exciting time viewing them.

If you are considering buying real estate in Wyoming, the Cody, Clark, Powell and Greybull areas have so much to offer. The mountains of Northwest Wyoming hold so much adventure and recreational opportunities for all ages. And this is all in our back yard.



19 February, 2011

Many properties are advertised as bordering BLM and often we are asked what this stands. BLM is an agency in the Department of Interior. The landscape that BLM manages in Northwest Wyoming is charterized by native rangeland for the most part. Sometimes BLM will adjoin National Forest. Since it is public land, if a property adjoins BLM, as a land owner, you can horseback ride or hike from your property across the BLM. ATV’s can only be used on marked roads. Being situated next to BLM offers additional privacy.The Clark area, which is 30 miles north of Cody at the base of the Beartooth Mountains, is checker boarded with BLM with large expanses that are closer to and adjoining National Forest.


Yellowstone National Park

29 July, 2011

It was going to be a hot Sunday, so after breakfast, my husband and I decided to go to Yellowstone. At a higher elevation it would be cooler, so we took our 1950 Chevy hardtop and cruised down the road. We went in through the East Gate, 50 miles west of Cody. Teddy Roosevelt called it the ‘most scenic 50 miles in America.’

This rock formation on the way to the East Gate is known as the ‘Holy City.” It is called this as it resembles the sillouette of the ancient city of Jerusalem. It was formed millions of years ago by volacanic activity.



Chimney Rock is another unique formation on the road from Cody to Yellowstone.


Elephant Head is another interesting formation on the way YellowstoneElephant Head


As we drive through the East Gate and up Sylvan Pass, we see evidence of the heavy snow melt as water cascades down the sides of the mountain.


As we drive through an open meadow before Yellowstone Lake, we see a field of beautiful wildflowers.This was an exceptional year for snow in the mountains during late Spring. Thus, the rivers are flowing at maximum. This is the Yellowstone River where we had lunch. You can see the trees in the middle of the river.This was a small island now covered by water.


Mud pots in Yellowstone are present where hot water is limited and hydrogen sulfide gas is present and sulfuric acid is generated. The hydrogen sulfide gas emits an odor smelling like rotten eggs. Our next stop was Artist Point and the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone and  Flowers on Dunraven Pass



Buffalo in Lamar Valley and we came back home through the Northeast Gate, down off Dead Indian Pass in time to barbeque steaks.



Water Rights In Wyoming

25 January, 2012

We often get asked about water rights or irrigation. In the State of Wyoming, all water is owned by the State and has been adjudicated through a priority system dating back to territorial dates to certain lands. If a property has adjudicated water rights attached to the legal description, those water rights stay with the land when it is sold. Wyoming is a high desert, semi-arid climate with average rainfall being 6 to 10 inches per year. Supplemental water is needed to grow crops or a landscaped yard. Irrigation rights on smaller parcels are usually part of a larger water right and are generally shared with neighboring smaller parcels. In many cases, there are irrigation districts that cover a larger area and oversee the water rights in that district. There is a yearly charge for the delivery of water. That assessment covers the maintenance of the canals and ditches in that district. Fees vary from district to district. Many times in a neighborhood with small parcels, there will be an association with a water master. For more detailed information, visit http://seo.state.wy.us/PDF/living_small_acreage.pdf. Water is gold in Wyoming. From the fertile ground, lush crops can be produced.

undefinedundefinedIf you are looking at land for sale that does not have irrigation or just looking for a home site, you most likely will be drilling a well. This is done by obtaining a permit from the State Engineer’s office. The cost is $50 for the application. When the well is complete and hooked up to a power source, a Completion Statement is filled out and sent into the State Engineer’s office. They will then adjudicate the water right to that property and assign a number. A domestic well allows for watering of one acre around the home site.

 For additional information on water rights in the State of Wyoming, contact the State Engineer’s Office, http://seo.state.wy.us/index.aspx

Hunting in Wyoming

03 November, 2016

The Absoraka Mountains, Beartooth Mountains, Shoshone National Forest, and Bighorn Basin that surround Cody are prime locations for hunting this fall. This area is renowned for its variety of wildlife, including some of the area’s best big game hunting opportunities. In this picturesque area, elk, moose, bighorn sheep, bison, mule and whitetail deer, mountain goat, antelope, black bear, and even wolves can be scoped and targeted.

The area has an abundance of animals like whitetail and mule deer and pronghorn antelope; in fact, Wyoming has more antelope (specifically, the North American pronghorn) than anywhere on the continent. Mule deer are also the state’s most populous and sought-after deer. These graceful and agile deer can be found in the mountains or creek beds, so hunters have a variety of backdrops from which to choose when hunting mule deer.

However, the state has a limit for hunting animals like bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and bison. Receiving a bighorn sheep tag is comparable to winning the lottery; the odds in a random draw are typically less than 1 percent, and once a hunter receives this license, he or she must wait five years to re-apply. Similarly, drawing for a mountain goat tag requires a lot of luck, and hunting either of these animals requires a person to hike or climb in high elevations and often steep terrain. In order to hunt bison in Wyoming, hunters have to apply for placement on the bison priority list.

Mountain lions are also hunted from September through early spring, and the fall and spring seasons are also open for black bear hunting. For both of these animals, though, only one lion or bear can be “harvested” by a hunter during any calendar year.

Finally, upland and migratory game birds like the various grouse species (sage, ruffed, etc.), turkeys, pheasants, geese, and duck (just to name a few) can be hunted, as well.

Outfitters can provide expert advice for hunting in the area, and there are many outfitters in and around Cody. For a full list of hunting outfitters and guides, check out http://codychamber.chambermaster.com/list/Category/outfitters-guides-133.htm.

For more information about hunting regulations or to apply for a hunting license in Wyoming, go to http://gf.state.wy.us or call the Cody BLM Field office at (307) 578-5900.